Skip to content
Advertisements

OM/U5 Topic 8 Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)

Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is a system of maintaining and improving the integrity of production and quality systems through the machines, equipment, processes, and employees that add business value to an organization.

TPM focuses on keeping all equipment in top working condition to avoid breakdowns and delays in manufacturing processes.

Objective of TPM

  • Improving the effectiveness of machines
  • Improving the efficiency, reliability and effectiveness of maintenance of machine
  • Scheduling maintenance for avoiding early maintenance
  • Involving operation team also in smaller scale maintenance, such as machine checklist inspection before starting and after closing the machines
  • Arrangement of training for amending the skills of employees

The Eight(8) pillars of TPM

  1. Autonomous Maintenance: Operators monitor the condition of their own equipment and work areas
  2. Process & Machine Improvement: Team leaders collect information from operators and work areas, then prioritize preventative maintenance and improvements
  3. Preventative Maintenance: Operators and team leaders share preventative maintenance tasks and schedules
  4. Early Management of New Equipment: Team leaders anticipate and plan for parts of equipment lifecycles and report to mangers, based on maintenance reports
  5. Process Quality Management: Shared responsibility for operation and maintenance encourages quality improvement ideas from all areas of work
  6. Administrative Work: Managers prioritize data from the previous pillars and share outcomes with team leaders and work areas
  7. Education & Training: Continuous improvement includes operator and work area education and training which improves morale, retention and efficiency
  8. Safety & Sustained Success: Facility-wide safety is prioritized, which positively impacts sustained success of the TPM program

As maintenance is traditionally considered an inevitable and “not-for-profit” function, TPM is considered the most difficult lean manufacturing tool to implement. Shifting cultural beliefs within a facility, from the CEO to machinists and janitors, may take years but the pay off for both the finished product and employee morale is worth the investment.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

1 Comment »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: